Find Out How Far Humanity Has Come With These Black & White Pics That Were Colorized

Published on 04/22/2021
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Numerous historical events merit a second look. While old photographs were printed in black and white, we now have the technology to colorize them! The monochrome scheme, in our opinion, did not do them justice at all. We’re grateful that someone else had the foresight to colorize these old photographs. They’re entertaining to look at and will take you down memory lane. A word of caution: some of these images are not suitable for all viewers. It’s a good idea to tread carefully!

Mata Hari Was A True Icon

Mata Hari was a beautiful spy and dancer who took the world by storm. She’s been referred to as a feminist, a courtesan, and a spy, among other things. Regardless of these labels, we all know how difficult it is to replicate her story. She had no qualms about jumping into risky endeavors, even if it did lead to her demise. The National Ballet’s director and choreographer, Ted Brandsen, had this to say about her: “What fascinated us is the story of a woman with an incredible lust for life and a powerful instinct to survive, and to reinvent herself and to transform herself. She had a lot of horrible things happen to her and she managed to somehow give a spin to it and find her way out.”

Mata Hari Was A True Icon

Mata Hari Was A True Icon

Stock Market Crash On Black Tuesday

The United States of America hit rock bottom on Black Tuesday when Wall Street traders lost billions of dollars and investors were devastated in a single day. On October 29, 1929, fewer than 16 million shares were traded. It was the final day of a tumultuous six-day period during which investment bankers attempted to keep the market under control by purchasing large blocks of stock. On this day, prices plummeted to zero. It emptied bank accounts and contributed to the demise of the industrialized world, plunging the United States into what is now known as the Great Depression.

Stock Market Crash On Black Tuesday

Stock Market Crash On Black Tuesday

Giving A Fellow Hollywood Star The Side Eye

Hollywood frenemies are nothing new! Take a look at this photo of Sophia Loren with her head perched next to Jayne Mansfield’s bust. It appeared that the latter had crashed a party! The truth was that this photo was taken at a Paramount party to commemorate the Italian star’s arrival in the United States. In 1957, it took place in Beverly Hills. The celebrant, who was seated next to Clifton Webb, was seen being bombarded by her colleague’s assets. Although Loren was caught in the shot, this was most likely a publicity stunt for Jayne Mansfield. Loren expressed her inability to look away from Mansfield. Furthermore, she has consistently refused to sign prints of this particular photograph.

Giving A Fellow Hollywood Star The Side Eye

Giving A Fellow Hollywood Star The Side Eye

Entering The Jaws Of Death Without A Clue

By storming the beaches of Normandy, soldiers from Canada, England, and the United States turned the tide of the war! Many young men in the military were aware that they might never return home once they entered the fray. Tom Jensen worked for the 626th Engineer Light Equipment Company as a sergeant. He told the Chicago Tribune that other soldiers had no idea where they were going until they arrived. “They didn’t tell us anything we didn’t need to know. Heck, some of the guys on our ship thought we were headed to Japan, not Normandy. Just months earlier, we were either in high school or working odd jobs. We weren’t soldiers, at least not yet,” said the vet.

Entering The Jaws Of Death Without A Clue

Entering The Jaws Of Death Without A Clue

Marilyn Monroe Is Pretty In Pink

In 1952, Harold Lloyd photographed the movie star for Life Magazine. This was their first photo collaboration, but it would not be their last. After a year, the two of them collaborated once more. This time, it was for a swimsuit spread shot on his estate, Greenacres. Marilyn Monroe had a lot of fun with him because the estate provided her with the privacy she required. His daughter said that she was a great house guest: “She was my age, or maybe a year or two younger, but we came from very different worlds. She sat down to put on her makeup, and we just started chatting about our lives. She insisted on seeing the baby and talked about how she dreamed of having a child of her own one day.”

Marilyn Monroe Is Pretty In Pink

Marilyn Monroe Is Pretty In Pink

Teenage German Soldier In Distress After His Capture

It’s difficult to find a photograph from WWII that isn’t emotionally charged. Take a look at this photo of Hans-Georg Henke, a 16-year-old German soldier. This photo was taken on April 3, 1945, after being captured by the US 9th Army. His parents had died the year before, prompting him to enlist in the Luftwaffe to help support the rest of his family. The photographer, John Florea, said the boy was crying and shocked. It’s understandable because he was a young boy who experienced the worst of the war.

Teenage German Soldier In Distress After His Capture

Teenage German Soldier In Distress After His Capture

The Fattest, Shortest, And Tallest Men In Europe

Isn’t it incredible to see three people at the pinnacle of their fields? At one point, these guys were Europe’s tallest, tiniest, and heaviest men. These images reveal a lot about the human race! Isn’t it fascinating to see how diverse human beings can be? Despite this, the guys are getting along swimmingly. This photograph was taken in 1913, well over a century ago!

The Fattest, Shortest, And Tallest Men In Europe

The Fattest, Shortest, And Tallest Men In Europe

Meet Jungle Pam

Many people were enticed into drag racing by Jungle Pam. There appears to be nothing more effective than a stunning bombshell in shorts when it comes to attracting fans. She got into the industry at the age of 18 after meeting a drag racer named Jungle Jim in Pennsylvania. She dropped out of college to pursue a career in drag racing! Her pal was on hand to show her the ropes. She proved to be a quick study and became the center of their pit crew’s attention. To be fair, we can completely understand why this happened. Take a look at her!

Meet Jungle Pam

Meet Jungle Pam

How The Mona Lisa Survived The Second World War

Is there a painting more famous than the Mona Lisa? It has been stolen on several occasions in the past, but it was last seen at the Louvre during WWII. The director of France’s National Museums, Jacques Jaujard, devised a plan to keep it safe from the Nazis. On the 25th of August 1939, when the Soviet Union and Germany signed the Non-Aggression Pact, he closed the museum for three days “for repairs.” All of the paintings were removed, the statues were relocated, and the works of art were placed in wooden crates. Red dots were used to indicate the importance of the pieces in these boxes. Thousands of artifacts and crates were then transported to the Loire Valley by hundreds of trucks.

How The Mona Lisa Survived The Second World War

How The Mona Lisa Survived The Second World War

Carl Akeley And The Leopard That Attacked Him

Taxidermy is, in our opinion, a fascinating profession in and of itself. Carl Akeley is even cooler than the average person! During his African safaris, the jack of all trades had numerous encounters with wild animals. He was very serious about his job. He didn’t just use whatever he had on hand to stuff the skins. Instead, he studied their bodies to ensure that the final products were realistic. While hunting for ostriches in Somaliland in 1896, he came face to face with a leopard. It was a battle for his life, and he barely made it out alive.

Carl Akeley And The Leopard That Attacked Him

Carl Akeley And The Leopard That Attacked Him

Brigitte Bardot At Her Peak

Brigitte Bardot was once considered to be the most beautiful woman on the planet. The actress cast a spell on the audience and made the most of her roles. In the 1950s and 1960s, she was arguably one of the most popular women on the planet. Unfortunately, her celebrity has made it impossible for her to maintain any semblance of privacy. “I don’t know what it means to sit quietly in a bistro, on a terrace, or in the theatre without being approached by someone,” she once told The Guardian.

Brigitte Bardot At Her Peak

Brigitte Bardot At Her Peak

Arsenal Goalie Jack Kelsey On A Very Foggy Day

This photo of Arsenal’s Jack Kelsey staring into the fog was taken in 1954. The image below is frequently misidentified as being from a viral story from 1937’s Christmas Day. A game between Chelsea and Stamford Ridge was played on a foggy day, according to this story. The game was called after only 61 minutes, but no one informed the Stamford Bridge goalkeeper.

He said, “I paced up and down my goal-line, happy in the knowledge that Chelsea were being pinned in their own half. ‘The boys must be giving the Pensioners the hammer,’ I thought smugly, as I stamped my feet for warmth… After a long time a figure loomed out of the curtain of fog in front of me. It was a policeman, and he gaped at me incredulously. ‘What on earth are you doing here?’ he gasped. ‘The game was stopped a quarter of an hour ago. The field’s completely empty’. And when I groped my way to the dressing-room, the rest of the Charlton team, already out of the bath and in their civvies, were convulsed with laughter.”

Arsenal Goalie Jack Kelsey On A Very Foggy Day

Arsenal Goalie Jack Kelsey On A Very Foggy Day

Little Ruby Bridges And Her U.S. Marshal Escorts

Isn’t it amazing that a little girl played a crucial part in the civil rights movement? Ruby Bridges was the first black student in the South to attend a desegregated elementary school. Despite the fact that William Frantz Elementary School was only a few blocks from her home in New Orleans, federal marshals had to accompany her to class for her safety. The little girl, unfortunately, had to deal with racists daily. She had to study alone because white parents threatened to pull their children out if she studied with them. She graduated from a desegregated high school more than a decade later. She founded the Ruby Bridges Foundation in 1999 to use education to promote change and tolerance.

Little Ruby Bridges And Her U.S. Marshal Escorts

Little Ruby Bridges And Her U.S. Marshal Escorts

A Utility Worker Delivering The Kiss Of Life

Rocco Morabito captured this incredible image in 1967. It’s called “The Kiss of Life,” and it follows J.D. Thompson, a utility worker, as he tries to save his colleague Randall G. Champion. Moments before this, his coworker made contact with a low-voltage line. The poor guy was immediately knocked out. It was fortunate for Thompson that he was a quick thinker! Morabito was reportedly driving down West 26th Street when he witnessed the incident.

“I heard screaming. I looked up and I saw this man hanging down. Oh my God. I didn’t know what to do. I took a picture right quick. J.D. Thompson was running toward the pole. I went to my car and called an ambulance. I got back to the pole and J.D. was breathing into Champion. I backed off, way off until I hit a house and I couldn’t go any farther. I took another picture. Then I heard Thompson shouting down: He’s breathing!” he shared.

A Utility Worker Delivering The Kiss Of Life

A Utility Worker Delivering The Kiss Of Life

A German Soldier In His Dugout During The Great War

Trench warfare played a significant role in the First World War. Soldiers dig ditches to provide both defense and the last stand in this military tactic, dating back to the Civil War. Troops in Belgium and northern France had to pass through narrow trenches and stay for weeks at a time. The trenches were, in fact, the cause of the First World War’s mass casualties. These were the soldiers who had to emerge from the trenches to deal with approaching forces. Unfortunately for them, the area was effectively a “no man’s land,” making them easy targets for the offensive gunfire.

A German Soldier In His Dugout During The Great War

A German Soldier In His Dugout During The Great War

The Gorgeous Elizabeth Taylor While Taping Giant In 1956

Elizabeth Taylor had a truly remarkable life. She began her acting career in 1941, but it wasn’t until the 1950s that she got her big break, starring alongside Rock Hudson and James Dean in Giant. The actress once stated that she did not watch her films but rather relished the memories associated with their production. “It’s been a long time since I’ve seen Giant. I don’t look at old movies of myself. I don’t even look at new ones of myself. But I loved Jimmy and I loved Rock. And I was the last person Jimmy was with before he drove to his death…But that was a private, personal moment,” she said.

The Gorgeous Elizabeth Taylor While Taping Giant In 1956

The Gorgeous Elizabeth Taylor While Taping Giant In 1956

Hawaiian Night Fishing, 1948

What a beautiful photograph! Can you imagine wading out into the water with a live flame hovering over your head? This is even more incredible when you consider that he was fishing with a spear. Hawaiians have fished in shallow waters with spears for generations. Strong woods like koai’e, uhiuhi, o’a, and kauila are frequently used. They are usually 6 to 7 feet long and have a pointed end. The fishermen used the light of torches made from coconut leaves stuck to their homemade poles to attract fish. They burned nuts in bamboo to make it brighter when they needed it to be.

Hawaiian Night Fishing, 1948

Hawaiian Night Fishing, 1948

Charlie Chaplin And Albert Einstein At The Premiere Of City Lights

If you assumed Albert Einstein spent his days with other scientists, you were mistaken! He was a witty and imaginative individual who saw himself as an artist. We can see why he and Charlie Chaplin hit it off after being introduced by Universal Studios’ head, Carl Laemmle. The scientist and the comedian attended the premiere of City Lights together in 1931! Einstein is said to have confessed that he envied his friend because the world could understand him without saying a single word. “But your fame is even greater… the world admires you when nobody understands you,” Chaplin replied.

Charlie Chaplin And Albert Einstein At The Premiere Of City Lights

Charlie Chaplin And Albert Einstein At The Premiere Of City Lights

Paratroopers Of Easy Company Chilling At Adolf Hitler’s Home

The guys in the photo appear to be having a good time, but it’s even better than that! Taken in 1945, the men of Easy Company had been chilling at Adolf Hitler’s house in the Bavarian Alps. If you’ve seen the miniseries Band of Brothers, you’ll recognize this scene. Hitler amassed several residences throughout Europe, including this one in Obersalzberg, Bavaria. On the 25th of April, 1945, it was bombed. Only hours before the French 2nd Armored Division and the US 3rd Infantry Division entered it through the secret tunnels, SS troops set it on fire. The Allies rewarded themselves by looting the house and taking the remaining alcohol!

Paratroopers Of Easy Company Chilling At Adolf Hitler's Home

Paratroopers Of Easy Company Chilling At Adolf Hitler’s Home

Vivien Leigh In The Role Of Scarlett O’Hara

Actress Vivien Leigh starred in Gone with the Wind even though she was English and no Southern Belle. In any case, this was a pivotal role in her career! People found her hysterical and difficult to work with once she arrived in Los Angeles for taping. She and her co-star Laurence Olivier thought the film would bomb at the time. He even told her, “You have got to justify yourself in the next two or 3 films (or even 2 or 3 years) by proving that the presumable failure of Gone W.T.W. was not your fault and you can only do that by being really good in the following parts. To make a success of your career in pictures [is] ESSENTIAL for your self respect, and our ultimate happiness therefore. … If you don’t, I am afraid you may become just — well boring.”

Vivien Leigh In The Role Of Scarlett O'Hara

Vivien Leigh In The Role Of Scarlett O’Hara

Lawrence Of Arabia In Real Life

During the First World War, Colonel Thomas Edward Lawrence found himself in an unusual situation. He was a British demolition artist who collaborated with Arab rebel allies to demolish Ottoman Empire depots and bridges. He was the inspiration for Lawrence of Arabia! According to him, he attacked 79 railway bridges, causing them to need to be demolished and rebuilt. He wrecked the railways so badly that some of the ruins can still be seen. Instead of tearing down some of the rubble, the Turkish military decided to leave some of it!

Lawrence Of Arabia In Real Life

Lawrence Of Arabia In Real Life

The Smallest Man And His Huge Pet Cat

What a fantastic photograph! Henry Behrens was the smallest man on the planet when he was alive, standing only 30 inches tall. On top of that, he was only about 32 pounds. He became a member of Burton Lester’s small people troupe and traveled around the world with them. We’re glad he didn’t mind and even enjoyed the attention. Just look at this adorable photo from 1956 of him dancing with his cat!

The Smallest Man And His Huge Pet Cat

The Smallest Man And His Huge Pet Cat

Japanese-Americans Were Relocated To Internment Camps

Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, the US military imposed restrictions on Japanese-Americans. They were incarcerated in internment camps, which were essentially glorified prisons. The truth was that the military had no reason to act in this manner because the civilians posed no threat. Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga discussed her encounter with one near Death Valley. “The only thing that was in the ‘apartments’ when we got there were army metal beds with the springs on it, and a potbellied stove in the middle of the room. That was the only thing. No chest of drawers, no nothing, no curtains on the windows. It was the barest of the bare,” she said. How awful. This photo of Japanese-American students was taken in 1942.

Japanese Americans Were Relocated To Internment Camps

Japanese-Americans Were Relocated To Internment Camps

Lyndon B. Johnson Was Sworn Into Office Aboard Air Force One

For about an hour and a half after John F. Kennedy was assassinated, the United States had no president. VPOTUS Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn into office aboard Air Force One while it was parked at Love Field in Dallas, as the country was in a state of confusion and chaos. First Ladies Jacqueline Kennedy and Lady Bird Johnson are on his left. Onlookers include FBI agents and his new cabinet members. They all wore anxious and tense facial expressions revealed how much anxiety and tension had been in the air.

Lyndon B. Johnson Was Sworn Into Office Aboard Air Force One

Lyndon B. Johnson Was Sworn Into Office Aboard Air Force One

A Japanese Military Commander In Traditional Armor

Felice Beato took this photograph in 1863. The photographer colored it by hand in the first version! He preferred to shoot full-length portraits in the studio to concentrate on the traditional costumes and cultural traditions that he found fascinating. His photographs of Japan had vignetting around the edges, giving them a more painterly appearance. Koboto Santaro, a military commander, was the subject of this photograph. We don’t know what he’s holding in his hand, but we’d keep a safe distance from him!

A Japanese Military Commander In Traditional Armor

A Japanese Military Commander In Traditional Armor

Sally Field As Gidget

Sally Field got her big break in Gidget in 1965, playing a surfer girl who always got herself into trouble. She was 18 years old at the time. “After the first night of my workshop, a casting guy asked me if I had an agent. I didn’t, but I still went in for an interview. The waiting room was filled with girls who looked like movie stars. They all had professional head shots; the only pictures I had were wallet photos of me with my friends. At my screen test, I walked in and said, ‘Which one is the camera?’ The crew members were like, ‘Oh, boy.’ But the casting director said, ‘You’re it.’ God was looking out for me. He thought he’d throw me in the ocean and see if I could swim,” the actress narrated.

Sally Field As Gidget

Sally Field As Gidget

The Red Army Liberated The Auschwitz-Birkenau

When the Soviet Army arrived at Auschwitz on January 27, 1945, they discovered a warehouse full of victims’ belongings. Pans, pots, eyeglasses, prosthetic limbs, and shoes were among the items discovered. They initially assumed the camp had been abandoned. They soon discovered that it was full of sick and starving people that the Nazis had left behind when they fled. Georgii Elisavetskii was one of the first soldiers to enter the camp. He said, “They rushed toward us shouting, fell on their knees, kissed the flaps of our overcoats, and threw their arms around our legs.”

The Red Army Liberated The Auschwitz Birkenau

The Red Army Liberated The Auschwitz-Birkenau

Oregon Man Thomas Cave With His Social Security Number Tattoo

At the height of the Great Depression, Thomas Cave and his wife Annie were among the legions of people who struggled. The photographer Dorothea Lange claimed that the couple worked nonstop for a year to earn $550, which would be $10,000 in today’s money. They rented a tiny apartment for $12 a month, only to find themselves unemployed. In 1937, just four months before he got his tattoo, the Social Security Act was signed into law. People who opted in and received a social security number were given relief under this act. Cave had the number tattooed on his arm so that he wouldn’t forget it. At the time, he wasn’t the only one who did this.

Oregon Man Thomas Cave With His Social Security Number Tattoo

Oregon Man Thomas Cave With His Social Security Number Tattoo

The Effervescent Sophia Loren

Sophia Loren was only 17 years old when she made her film debut in Quo Vadis in 1951. She has since appeared in several projects. She was once asked if there were anything she would do differently if she could. She only said, “In a long, long career like I had—and by the way, I have—it’s very difficult to be able to criticize some of the moments that you do by yourself that you never tell to other people. It’s a very normal thing to do because you cannot every time have a big victory – no, there have been moments, maybe weak moments, where you did something that you are not really very happy about.”

The Effervescent Sophia Loren

The Effervescent Sophia Loren

A Soldier Heading Home After The War

Ernst Haas straddled the line between photojournalist and artist throughout his four-decade photography career. He infused artistry into his photographs of soldiers returning home after WWII. He captured the desperation and confusion in Europe at the time in a photo essay titled “Homecoming,” in which people searched for relatives among the survivors. It was a successful collection that assisted him in achieving even greater success. He turned them all down! “What I want is to stay free, so that I can carry out my ideas… I don’t think there are many editors who could give me the assignments I give myself,” he said.

A Soldier Heading Home After The War

A Soldier Heading Home After The War

After The Engagement Of John F. Kennedy And Jackie Bouvier

Jackie Bouvier and John F. Kennedy visited the Kennedy family home on Cape Cod after their engagement. Their engagement photos were taken by a reporter who accompanied them. There was even a special issue of Life Magazine dedicated to their engagement photos! The headline of the July 20 issue read, “Senator Kennedy Goes a-Courting.” Looking back on those days, Jackie said, “Now, I think that I should have known that he was magic all along. I did know it — but I should have guessed that it would be too much to ask to grow old with and see our children grow up together. So now, he is a legend when he would have preferred to be a man.”

After The Engagement Of John F. Kennedy And Jackie Bouvier

After The Engagement Of John F. Kennedy And Jackie Bouvier

A Civil War Veteran In Pennsylvania

Isn’t it strange that Civil War veterans were still alive in the twentieth century? The last of them was reported to have died in 1956. The truth is that there were most likely several more around at the time. If they could follow orders and hold a gun, young men had no choice but to fight. After serving in the bloodiest war ever fought on American soil, many of them still had a bright future ahead of them. We’re sure they had plenty of stories to share with the kids. This photograph was taken in the year 1935.

A Civil War Veteran In Pennsylvania

A Civil War Veteran In Pennsylvania

Cornet Winston Churchill In The 4th Queen’s Hussar’s Cavalry

Winston Churchill is best known for his dedication to his country. As a young man, he was part of the 4th Queen’s Hussar’s Calvary and served during “the august, unchallenged and tranquil glories of the Victorian Era.” He spent seven months of the summer training and the rest of the year on extended leave at the time. During his leave in 1895, he went on an adventure to Cuba! After that, he and the rest of the regiment were sent to India. When this photograph was taken in 1895, he was 21 years old.

Cornet Winston Churchill In The 4th Queen's Hussar's Cavalry

Cornet Winston Churchill In The 4th Queen’s Hussar’s Cavalry

The Real Albert Einstein

Many people believe Albert Einstein was a genius who lived in an ivory tower. This was far from the case! He saw himself as an artist who worked with science as a medium. To arrive at his theories, he combined inspiration, imagination, and knowledge. In 1929, he spoke to the Saturday Evening Post and said, “I believe in intuitions and inspirations. I sometimes feel that I am right. I do not know that I am… [but] I would have been surprised if I had been wrong… I am enough of the artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.”

The Real Albert Einstein

The Real Albert Einstein

Hitchhiking Was Common In The ’60s And ’70s

People relied on hitchhiking to get around the country in the 1970s. It was a little risky, but the thought of the freedom that came with it enticed young people. The truth is that hitchhiking has always been a part of human culture since the beginning of time. However, it was only in the 1970s that it became more popular. These kids put their lives in the hands of strangers behind the wheel back then. However, this has become much less common in recent years. People still hitchhike, but not as frequently as they used to.

Hitchhiking Was Common In The '60s And '70s

Hitchhiking Was Common In The ’60s And ’70s

Geologist Thomas Griffith Taylor And Meteorologist Charles Wright Beside An Iceberg

People were awestruck as explorers took on the Arctic at the turn of the century. People competed for the honor of being the first to reach the South Pole! Robert Falcon Scott, a British explorer, launched the Terra Nova Expedition in 1911 to do just that. On their way to the “pole hunt,” the group encountered difficult conditions. They arrived on January 16, 1912, after nearly a year of waiting. The most tragic aspect of the story was that a flag had already been placed there! Norway’s Roald Amundsen beat them by a month.

Geologist Thomas Griffith Taylor And Meteorologist Charles Wright Beside An Iceberg

Geologist Thomas Griffith Taylor And Meteorologist Charles Wright Beside An Iceberg

Charlie Chaplin When He Was 27 Years Old

Do you have any idea how Charlie Chaplin looked when he wasn’t playing the Tramp? The truth is that he was nothing like the unlucky bowler hat wearer! As the son of a failing actress, he was born into poverty. He, too, took to the stage and then relocated from London to America! It didn’t take him long to make a name for himself on the other side of the Atlantic. He based the Tramp on his father’s memories. “It was just released whole from somewhere deep within my father, it was really my father’s alter ego, the little boy who never grew up: ragged, cold, hungry, but still thumbing his nose at the world,” he said.

Charlie Chaplin When He Was 27 Years Old

Charlie Chaplin When He Was 27 Years Old

The Seaforth Highlanders With A Dog In Their French Trench

During the Great War, Europe worked hard to defeat the Central Powers, which was unparalleled in its brutality and carnage! Soldiers from all over the world took part in massive battles despite being woefully underprepared. The Seaforth Highlanders of Scotland, founded in 1881, stepped up to fight the fascists. Following the 78th and 72nd Highlanders merger, it became known as the county regiment for various northern Scottish counties. The men were initially stationed in India but were reassigned to France in 1914 to fight in the Battle of Givenchy. Later, they were relocated to Palestine and Iraq.

The Seaforth Highlanders With A Dog In Their French Trench

The Seaforth Highlanders With A Dog In Their French Trench

Salvador Dali Aboard The S.S. Normandie In New York City

Salvador Dali was an artist who didn’t seem to belong in any particular time or place. Despite this, his surrealist paintings and experiments in the early twentieth century drew a lot of attention! He was influenced by his early trips to New York City, among other things. When he and his wife first visited New York, they boarded the Champlain from Franc and were forced to stay on one of the lower decks near the machine rooms. According to Patroness Caresse Crosby, he only said, “I am next to the engine, so that I’ll get there quicker.”

Salvador Dali Aboard The S.S. Normandie In New York City

Salvador Dali Aboard The S.S. Normandie In New York City

A Young Woman Called Eunice Hancock With A Compressed-Air Grinder In An Aircraft Plant

During WWII, men were compelled to enlist in the fight against Germany and Japan. To fill the void that they left in the labor market, women chose to work in utilities, transportation, and manufacturing! During WWII, nearly 2 million women worked in factories and on assembly lines to produce armaments and machine parts for the war effort. At the time, the number of working women had risen from 27% to 37%! These women contributed just as much to the war effort as the men.

A Young Woman Called Eunice Hancock With A Compressed Air Grinder In An Aircraft Plant

A Young Woman Called Eunice Hancock With A Compressed Air Grinder In An Aircraft Plant

Pablo Picasso With Gifts From Gary Cooper In 1958

Is there anything cooler than this photo of Pablo Picasso with his revolver and hat? The artist enjoyed entertaining visitors and making friends with people from various walks of life. Gertrude Stein, Julio Gonzalez, and Andre Salmon were among his friends. All of these people lived in Paris at one point or another. Apart from them, Picasso had a friendship with Gary Cooper! They were so close in the 1950s that the artist hosted the actor and his family at his own ceramics shrine in Vallauris.

Pablo Picasso With Gifts From Gary Cooper In 1958

Pablo Picasso With Gifts From Gary Cooper In 1958

A Leading Stoker Called Popeye Who Was On The HMS Rodney

Popeye, the Sailor Man, looks exactly like the guy in the photo! E.C. Segar got the idea for the cartoon character from a man in his hometown, it turns out. This was not, however, the same man. The photograph depicts a man who served aboard the HMS Rodney in 1940. The odd thing was that the Imperial War Museum gave him the nickname “Popeye.” However, don’t get too excited. Let us remind you that the HMS Rodney was a British ship, while Segar was born and raised in Illinois.

A Leading Stoker Called Popeye Who Was On The HMS Rodney

A Leading Stoker Called Popeye Who Was On The HMS Rodney

The Reunion Of Two German Brothers After The Border Pass Agreement

Take a look at this breathtaking photograph of two German brothers. Nobody could cross the border when the Berlin Wall was built in 1961. This remained the case until 1963 when a border pass agreement was enacted. This allowed people to travel from West Berlin to the city’s eastern side. Although it did not provide relief to those who felt helpless, this was not a perfect solution. Some people were unable to see their families for two years. After 25 years, the wall finally came down.

The Reunion Of Two German Brothers After The Border Pass Agreement

The Reunion Of Two German Brothers After The Border Pass Agreement

Mata Hari Blew The French Firing Squad A Kiss

We’d like to show you Mata Hari again because her story is so compelling. During World War I, she worked as a dancer before becoming a spy. In her pursuits, this woman combined espionage and sexuality. She was already a natural impersonator before she became famous. She pretended to be Lady MacLeod, the daughter of an English lord, despite dancing in an Eastern style. While her spy days are legendary, they were short-lived. On the 15th of October 1917, she was shot and killed by a firing squad. She did not appear to be blindfolded and blew a kiss to the men before they murdered her.

Mata Hari Blew The French Firing Squad A Kiss

Mata Hari Blew The French Firing Squad A Kiss

Photographers Used Backdrops To Hide The Devastation In Warsaw

Regardless of which side they fought on during WWII, Europe was a shambles after the war. Poland, too, suffered a great deal of devastation. The country used to be known for its beautiful structures, but many of them have since been demolished. Survivors wished to return to their previous lives, but it was difficult to do so. Photographers attempted to restore some semblance of normalcy to the citizens by pretending that nothing had happened. They were able to do so thanks to backdrops like this one! The contrast is mind-blowing.

Photographers Used Backdrops To Hide The Devastation In Warsaw

Photographers Used Backdrops To Hide The Devastation In Warsaw

American Soldiers Look At The Tricolor Flag Flying From The Eiffel Tower Again

The Nazis occupied Paris for four years. It was liberated on August 25, 1944, after a long struggle. After the arrival of the US 4th Infantry Division and the French 2nd Armored Division, the Nazis did not fight back. According to legend, Hitler ordered General Dietrich von Choltitz to set fire to Paris and demolish the Eiffel Tower. Instead of destroying the lovely city, he simply gave up. A liberation march was held through the Champs d’Elysees two days later to commemorate the event.

American Soldiers Look At The Tricolor Flag Flying From The Eiffel Tower Again

American Soldiers Look At The Tricolor Flag Flying From The Eiffel Tower Again

Men Of The 1st Infantry Division Leaving England For Normandy On D-Day

From June 1944 to August 1944, the Battle of Normandy was a difficult battle. The parties fought for Western Europe, and the soldiers did not have an easy time of it. We doubt that the 156,000 American, Canadian, and British troops had any idea that the battle would last nearly a month! It began on June 6, but it was supposed to start a day earlier. Due to inclement weather, the operation had to be postponed. Dwight Eisenhower told the brave troops, “You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you.”

Men Of The 1st Infantry Division Leaving England For Normandy On D Day

Men Of The 1st Infantry Division Leaving England For Normandy On D Day

Crow Native Americans Observing The Rodeo At The Crow Fair

The Crow Fair first took place in 1904! It’s essentially a huge family reunion for the Crow Nation, as it brings together all of the Great Plains Native American tribes. The event attracts tens of thousands of people! It takes place near Billings, Montana, in the third week of August. It’s a lot like a county fair, but it’s infused with Native American culture. On a daily basis, the rodeo featured youth events as well as professional bull and horse riders. You should go see it if you ever get the chance.

Crow Native Americans Observing The Rodeo At The Crow Fair

Crow Native Americans Observing The Rodeo At The Crow Fair

Drought Refugee From Missouri Waiting For Orange-Picking In California

After the Dust Bowl destroyed their homes, Americans fled to the Pacific Coast in search of seasonal work. These hardworking Americans were mistaken for intruders looking to take advantage of the government. California was looking for crop workers at the time, but the locals were not welcoming. Everyone was down on their luck because this happened during the Great Depression. Many immigrants were poor, but the fortunate ones were able to find low-paying jobs picking vegetables and fruits.

Drought Refugee From Missouri Waiting For Orange Picking In California

Drought Refugee From Missouri Waiting For Orange Picking In California

Dutch Resistance Fighters On The Streets Of Breda After Its Liberation

When Germany invaded Europe at the start of World War II, the world was stunned. The Nazis moved far faster and with far more brutality than anyone expected. Resistance fighters from across the continent banded together to aid in the liberation of their respective countries. The Dutch resistance provided counterintelligence, communications, and domestic sabotage to allies. The south was liberated in 1944. The north, on the other hand, took an additional eight months to liberate.

Dutch Resistance Fighters On The Streets Of Breda After Its Liberation

Dutch Resistance Fighters On The Streets Of Breda After Its Liberation

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